Navy Corpsman Recognizes Veterans

Florida Health Care Association Chief Lobbyist and Navy senior chief, Bob Asztalos has been visiting nursing centers throughout the state of Florida to present them with medals honoring their service.  The Florida Veterans Foundation has participated in these very special recognitions that honors the service of those who have served our country.   For the oldest vets, who may have served in World War II, the nursing centers are now their home.  Each veteran is honored in a ceremony and presented with a medal for their service. The program began when Florida Health Care noticed the World War II vets were dwindling at their annual Veterans Day breakfast.  “We felt like we needed to recognize those veterans before they are all gone,” Asztalos explained, “but we also discovered Vietnam veterans who have so much conflicting emotions over their service.”  One Vietnam veteran cried in gratitude and said it was the first time a person ever thanked him for his service. For more information on how you can honor your veterans complete the form below.

How to lead a great team

Congratulations on your new job!  Now the adventure begins. When you start a new job one of your first things on the “to do list” is to create a great team.   Becoming the new leader of an existing team can be challenging and involves gaining the respect and trust of those around you.  Trust is the key.  A team is not a group of people that work together, it is a group of people that trust each other.  Before a boss begins telling people what they need to do, the first step needs to be to make a connection with each person so that they want to be part of your team.  Connections with others build trust. Try this exercise.  Meet with each key person on your team and find out what they need to be successful at their job.  Sit down in a neutral, quiet place with no desks between you and ask these three simple questions: What do you like about your job?  What do you dislike about your job? and How can I help you?  As a leader your number one priority should be to make things better for others.  Naturally in long term care that is always the goal with patients, but that extends to staff as well.  Find ways to help others get ahead

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2020 Medicare Update

Medicare Update 2020 The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued the 2020 deductibles, coinsurance, and premium rates for beneficiaries covered through the Medicare fee for service program. The 2020 deductible, coinsurance and base premium rates are: 2020 Part A – Hospital insurance Deductible: $1,408.00 Coinsurance • $352.00 a day for 61st-90th day • $704.00 a day for 91st-150th day (lifetime reserve days) • $176.00 a day for 21st-100th day (skilled nursing facility coinsurance) 2020 Part B – Supplementary medical insurance (SMI) Under Part B of the Medicare supplementary medical insurance (SMI) program, enrollees are subject to a monthly premium. Most SMI services are subject to an annual deductible and coinsurance (percent of costs that the enrollee must pay), which are set by statute. Standard premium: $144.60 a month Deductible: $198.00 a year Coinsurance: 20% The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has set the Part A deductible, for hospital stays, at $1,364 for 2019. The coinsurance per day in the hospital for 2019 is $341 from the 61st day until the 90th day. Part B deductible, for doctor and lab tests, is $185. Medicare Part B covers one flu shot per season, with no copay or deductible. For Skilled Nursing Facility stays, the coinsurance is $170.50 per day for days 21 to 100. This information is for Medicare,

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Fasting Diets

Fasting diets are the newest fad in weight loss, but are they really new?  Fasting dates back centuries in the long tradition of religious fasting. Many religious groups have periods of fasting in their rituals including Muslims who fast from dawn until dusk during the month of Ramadan, and Christians, Jews, Buddhists, and Hindus who traditionally fast on designated days of the week or year. While recent interest in fasting is for weight loss, many of the studies on fasting focus on longevity and disease prevention. Researchers have know that when you restrict food intake, you can extend life span and it seems to enhance the ability to counteract the disease process.  Fasting is defined by eating no or very little food for periods ranging from 12 hours to three weeks. Below are a few different examples: Intermittent fasts Eating no food or cutting back on calorie intake (50 calories per day) only intermittently (like the 5:2 diet) Time-restricted feeding Consuming calories only for a four to six hour window each day (skipping breakfast and only eating luch or early supper) Periodic fasts An extreme approach, typically last several days or longer. These diets involve drinking only calorie-free fluids or very few calories for long stretches to get the body into full fasting mode. Fasting-mimicking diet a plant-based diet that

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Making Cozy Spaces at Work

Have you heard of hygee? (pronounced HOO-GA). Hygee is the Danish secret to happy living. It is about cozy togetherness and is an atmosphere and an experience. Being cozy with those we care about, getting comfortable by the fire with a warm cup of coca. How do we bring hygee to work?  Many of us are lucky enough to work in spaces that are also someone’s home, so the transition to cozy is easy. Dim lights and sweets to share are an obvious start. But any office can bring a little hygee and think of ways to make things more casual and cozy. Here are five ideas to get hygge going at the office. ORGANIZE A POTLUCK Instead of bring lunch just for yourself, why not organize potluck for lunch one day of the week? When everybody shares, everybody gets hygee. SET UP AN OFFICE GARDEN If the office allow it, hou can add to the hygge by planting a few plants. Spending a few minutes each day tending to them may be a nice way to manage stress. Use containers for herbs if there is not outdoor plots, but if you grow produce that can be enjoyed at the potluck that is better. BRING YOUR DOG TO WORK When my daughter went away to college, I started taking her

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Home for the Holidays – Tips for coping

“Oh, there’s no place like home for the holidays ‘Cause no matter how far away you roam When you pine for the sunshine of a friendly gaze For the holidays you can’t beat home sweet home!” Really?  I may have to protest Perry Como’s illusion of family gatherings.  For many, these forced get togethers are dreaded and for others the holidays are another reminder that they have limited or no family to celebrate with.  The Mayo Clinic offers this advise on surviving the Holiday blues. Stress, depression and the holidays: Tips for coping By Mayo Clinic Staff But with some practical tips, you can minimize the stress that accompanies the holidays. You may even end up enjoying the holidays more than you thought you would. Tips to prevent holiday stress and depression When stress is at its peak, it’s hard to stop and regroup. Try to prevent stress and depression in the first place, especially if the holidays have taken an emotional toll on you in the past. Acknowledge your feelings. If someone close to you has recently died or you can’t be with loved ones, realize that it’s normal to feel sadness and grief. It’s OK to take time to cry or express your feelings. You can’t force yourself to be happy just because it’s the holiday season. Reach out. If you feel

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